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dc.contributor.advisorHauser, Carl H.
dc.creatorSmith, Jessica Lyn
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T17:43:53Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T17:43:53Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/12069
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Computer Science, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThe world is becoming increasingly computerized; much of this computing hardware is put into silicon overseas, increasing the number of unknown or untrusted sourced ICs in critical systems. Current methods of determining the correctness of an IC are either destructive or non-specific, and usually focus on the physical structure of the IC. This work describes a solution which performs a logical, black-box analysis of the state machines upon which ICs are built. This solution was implemented on both a regular CPU and a GPU, to explore parallelization possibilities for speed benefits. These implementations were able to accurately discover the structure of the original state machines in all cases. Simulated state machines with twenty or fewer states were discoverable within one minute.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWashington State University, Computer Scienceen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectComputer science
dc.subjectComputer engineering
dc.subjectFSM
dc.subjectHardware Trojan
dc.subjectIC
dc.subjectReverse Engineering
dc.titleA Non-destructive Analysis Method for Integrated Circuit-Based Finite State Machines
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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