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dc.creatorInglis, Debbie, 1953-
dc.creatorGundersen, Babette
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-11T19:55:03Z
dc.date.available2019-12-11T19:55:03Z
dc.date.issued2019-11
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)1130311357
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/16846
dc.description.abstractLate blight is a historically famous plant disease that can be very serious in western Washington. It affects potatoes and tomatoes and certain nursery plants and weeds in the Solanaceae (potato family). The disease is capable of causing devastating crop losses, primarily because of the region’s mild, marine climate, which often favors rapid spread. Regardless of the crop or production system—potato or tomato; large or small farms either under conventional or organic management; greenhouses, hoop houses or high tunnels; nurseries or home gardens—late blight can be a problem whenever host plants are present. Successful management in western Washington requires comprehensive cultural and sanitation practices throughout the entire year along with regional cooperation, and, often times, applying protectant fungicides during the growing season.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPullman, Washington : Washington State University Extension
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTechnical Bulletin (Washington State University. Extension) ; 65E
dc.rightsCopyright Not Evaluated
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subject.lcshLate blight of potato -- Washington (State)
dc.subject.lcshPotatoes -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Washington (State)
dc.subject.lcshTomatoes -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Washington (State)
dc.subject.lcshPhytophthora diseases -- Control -- Washington (State)
dc.titleSeason-long management of late blight on potato and tomato in Western Washington
dc.typeExtension Publication


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