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dc.creatorSingh, Prastuti
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-29T22:59:13Z
dc.date.available2012-10-29T22:59:13Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4191
dc.descriptionThis is a research report written by Prastuti Singh that describes research carried out by her in the Collins research group in the Summer and Fall of 2009. The research was part of a culminating senior project that she completed for a high school degree at Pullman High School, Pullman, Washington. Prastuti wrote the report and submitted it to the highly competitive Intel Science Talent Search in November 2009. She was selected as a semifinalist in January 2010, winning not only that honor but a $1000 personal prize as well as a similar prize for Pullman High School. In March 2010, while still a high school student, she entered a university-wide poster competition at Washington State University. Below is a photo of her at the event. As of this writing, Prasuti is majoring in physics at Caltech. The research described herein was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR 09-04096 (Metals Program). Gary S.en_US
dc.description.abstractPerturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy is a method utilized to study hyperfine interactions within solids by observing the gamma rays emitted by the nuclear decay of probe atoms that have been artificially infused into the crystal structure. The IIIIn is a highly advantageous probe atom to use because its intermediate stage, IIICd, is relatively long lived and therefore provides researchers ample time to observe interactions. The purpose behind studying these hyperfine interactions is to gain a better understanding of atom diffusion in solids, whose properties (such as magnetic or electrical) often depend upon the distribution of atoms/elements. Through PAC, one can gain a better understanding of solids and their uses . The specific purpose of this project was to investigate the crystals of the CoGa3 structure and observe changes across different crystals. Samples were prepared using an arc furnace and then placed into the PAC to run for 6-10 (sometimes longer) days. CoGa3 structures contain two Ga (or In as the case might be) sites so two signals were expected and received. The curious aspect of the research was the relaxation frequency. The In3Rh and In3Ru seem to have a relaxation frequency crossover between the two sites while the In3Ir contained a shift from one iridium boundary to the other. The reason behind these occurrences is probably caused by the change in composition over time as the III In decays.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation; Hyperfine Interactions Group, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNational Science Foundation Grant DMR 09-04096 Metals Program Technical Report;6
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectPerturbed Angular Correlation PAC
dc.subjecthyperfine interactions
dc.subjectdiffusion behavior
dc.subjectatomic jump frequencies
dc.titleNuclear relaxation in CoGa3 lattice structures
dc.typeTechnical Report
dc.typeText


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