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dc.contributor.advisorDupler, Alice E.
dc.creatorMacDonald, Mistie
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T23:06:57Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T23:06:57Z
dc.date.issued4/3/2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4328
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractLegislation in the United States regulating nurse staffing has increased on a state level and has been discussed at the Federal level. This increase has been justified by research that shows a negative association between inadequate nurse staffing and patient outcomes. Using a systematic review of the literature, the association between nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes, including mortality and failure to rescue, is assessed. Literature supports that factors associated with nurse staffing—skill mix, education, work environment, and patient ratios—do have an impact on patient mortality. The effect of these staffing factors is not yet well understood and more research is needed to determine causal interactions.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.titleDoes Nurse Staffing Legislation Lead to Better Patient Outcomes?
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)