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dc.contributor.advisorCardell, Rebecca
dc.creatorHopkins-Hubbard, Tammy
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T17:37:03Z
dc.date.available2013-05-21T17:37:03Z
dc.date.issued5/21/2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4360
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractSuicide is conjectured to be a preventable sentinel event. In hospital settings, particularly emergency rooms and medical-surgical units, suicidal patients are frequently cared for by non-psychiatric nurses. This task can be challenging for nurses especially if they are not trained in conducting suicide assessments. This paper describes the personal and professional factors that can affect nurses' ability to conduct an accurate suicide risk assessment. While the concepts discussed can be used in either an inpatient or outpatient setting, the emphasis of this paper is focused on hospital-based nursing care.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.titleThe Professional and Personal Factors that Impact a Suicide Assessment
dc.typeText
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.typeResearch Project


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