Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcNeill, Brian W.
dc.creatorRangel, Sarah Jacqueline
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-20T18:40:21Z
dc.date.available2013-09-20T18:40:21Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4728
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Department of Counseling Psychology, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to determine how enculturation, acculturation, and familismo influence Latina/os' psychological well-being. A limited amount of studies have integrated enculturation, acculturation and familismo in their research designs to explore moderator and meditational hypotheses. Participants were 401 Latina/os who reside in the Southwest and Pacific Northwest of the United States and who are of Mexican heritage. Participants were recruited from the community, universities, and community colleges. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Attitudinal Familism Scale (AFS; Steidel & Contreras, 2003), the Pan-Hispanic Familism Scale (PHFS; Villareal, Blozis, and Widaman, 2005), the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (ARSMA-II; Cuellar et al., 1995), the Latina/o Values Scale (LVS; Kim et al., 2009), and the Psychological Well-Being-Short Scale (PWBSS; Van Dierendonck, 2005 and Diaz et al., 2006). Participants had the option to complete instruments in English or Spanish. Results for Hypothesis 1 was not supported and indicated that enculturation did not moderate the relationship between familismo and psychological well-being. However, both familismo and enculturation were positively related to psychological well-being. In Hypothesis 2, familismo and acculturation were positively related to psychological well-being; acculturation did moderate the relationship between familismo and psychological well-being as predicted. Thus, the relationship between familismo and psychological well-being was positive for both high and low acculturation groups; however the relationship was a bit stronger for low acculturated individuals. Hypothesis 3 was partially supported and indicated that enculturation moderately predicted psychological well-being but there was no significant mediation by familismo. Hypothesis 4 was not supported because there was no significant relationship between acculturation and psychological well-being. Hypothesis 5 was not supported because after controlling for levels of socioeconomic status, educational attainment, and age, Latina/os who were second generation tended to report higher scores on enculturation than those belonging in the first and 1.5 generation. Additionally, there were no differences in familismo and psychological well-being across all generations. For Hypothesis 6 as predicted, Latina/os who were first generation averaged lower on acculturation compared to those in the 1.5 and second generation. Interpretation and critique of the findings, clinical and theoretical implications, and future directions are discussed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Counseling Psychology, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectCounseling psychologyen_US
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen_US
dc.subjectEthnic studiesen_US
dc.subjectacculturationen_US
dc.subjectenculturationen_US
dc.subjectethnic identityen_US
dc.subjectfamilismoen_US
dc.subjectLatina/os of Mexican heritageen_US
dc.subjectpsychological well-beingen_US
dc.titleFAMILISMO, ENCULTURATION, AND ACCULTURATION AS PREDICTORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING IN LATINA/OS
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record