Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSalsbury, Thomas
dc.creatorJohnston, Joan Ann
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-20T18:44:15Z
dc.date.available2013-09-20T18:44:15Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4772
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Department of Teaching and Learning, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThis mixed methods study investigated the English verbal interactions of seven 3rd-6th grade beginning level English language learners across three different instructional settings: the mainstream grade level classroom, the sheltered English classroom, and the ELL pullout group. The quantitative component of the study documented significant differences in the frequency of English verbal interactions between the three instructional settings. The students were found to have the lowest frequency of overall English interaction in the mainstream classrooms, with the highest rates of interaction occurring in the ELL pullout groups. Peer interactions were found to be highest in the sheltered English classrooms, where students were among English language learning peers in a 3-week summer language program. Peer interactions in the mainstream classrooms, where the majority of students were native English speakers, were significantly lower than either the sheltered classroom or the pullout group.Grounded analysis of the observation notes from each observation session revealed completely divergent themes between the mainstream and sheltered classrooms. Students in the sheltered classrooms were observed to be highly engaged and enthusiastic; whereas, the same students were found to be largely disengaged, isolated, and frustrated or angry in the mainstream classrooms. Taken together, the quantitative and qualitative findings indicate that beginning level students are likely to be engaged in the content and the language when surrounded by other English language learners in the sheltered classrooms. Conversely, there is a strong tendency for students to withdraw from interaction or shut down when competing academically and socially with native speakers of English in the mainstream classroom.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Teaching and Learning, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectEnglish as a second languageen_US
dc.subjectElementary educationen_US
dc.subjectcontent-based instructionen_US
dc.subjectELLen_US
dc.subjectimmersionen_US
dc.subjectinteractionen_US
dc.subjectmainstreamed instructionen_US
dc.subjectsheltered instructionen_US
dc.titleElementary ELL Interaction: Mainstream v. Sheltered Instructional Settings
dc.typeText
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record