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dc.creatorCampbell, Donna
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-14T04:52:46Z
dc.date.available2015-11-14T04:52:46Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5616
dc.description.abstractThis article considers Christ stories written by authors Mary Austin and Jack London at the beginning of the twentieth century. That Austin, a mystic who believed she was in touch with Indian spirits, and London, an avowed materialist, should have written Christ stories at all seems unusual, but that both should express such concern over the reception of their stories deserves further investigation. To consider The Star Rover in the context of Austin's The Man Jesus raises several questions: First, how did London and Austin fashion their Christ stories to fit a popular audience? Second, how were their versions of the Christ story fashioned, if at all, to reflect progressive social policy? Third, what did London see in Austin's "Christ story" that made him turn to it first in the North American Review?en_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherThe Callen_US
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectLondon, Jack, 1876-1916en_US
dc.subjectAustin, Maryen_US
dc.subjectLiterary criticismen_US
dc.title"Have you read my 'Christ' story?": Mary Austin's The Man Jesus and London's The Star Rover
dc.typeText
dc.description.citationCampbell, Donna. Have you read my Christ story?: Mary Austin's The Man Jesus and London's The Star Rover." The Call 23.1-2 (2012): 9-13.


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  • Campbell, Donna
    This collection features research by Donna Campbell, professor of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature in the English department at Washington State University.

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