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dc.contributor.advisorThigpen, Jennifer
dc.creatorLaFrance, Emily
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-03T17:48:13Z
dc.date.available2016-05-03T17:48:13Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/6081
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the societal factors that made it possible for tattooed ladies to achieve success, self-sufficiency, and independence at a time when most women were expected only to be homemakers and mothers. To truly understand the social context that gave rise to the age of the tattooed lady, it is first necessary to shed light on the history of tattoos in the West.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHonors College, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectTattooing--United States--Historyen_US
dc.subjectCircus performers--United States--Historyen_US
dc.subjectGender studiesen_US
dc.titleFinding Lives of Independence: The Tattooed Lady and the Nineteenth-Century American Traveling Circus
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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