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dc.contributor.advisorCook, Diane J
dc.creatorThomas, Brian Louis
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-08T17:42:35Z
dc.date.available2018-05-08T17:42:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/13002
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Computer Science, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractSmart home technologies and the concept of home automation have become more popular in recent years. This popularity has been accompanied by social acceptance of passive sensors installed throughout the home. The subsequent increase in smart homes facilitates the creation of home automation strategies. We believe that home automation strategies can be generated intelligently by utilizing smart home sensors and activity learning. In this dissertation, we hypothesize that home automation can benefit from activity awareness. To test this, we develop our activity-aware smart automation system, CARL (CASAS Activity-aware Resource Learning). CARL learns the associations between activities and device usage from historical data and utilizes the activity-aware capabilities to control the devices. To help validate CARL we deploy and test three different versions of the automation system in a real-world smart environment. To provide a foundation of activity learning, we integrate existing activity recognition and activity forecasting into CARL home automation. We also explore two alternatives to using human-labeled data to train the activity learning models. The first unsupervised method is Activity Detection, and the second is a modified DBSCAN algorithm that utilizes Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) as a distance metric. We compare the performance of activity learning with human-defined labels and with automatically-discovered activity categories. To provide evidence in support of our hypothesis, we evaluate CARL automation in a smart home testbed. Our results indicate that home automation can be boosted through activity awareness. We also find that the resulting automation has a high degree of usability and comfort for the smart home resident.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWashington State University, Computer Scienceen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectComputer science
dc.subjectEnergy
dc.subjectactivity recognition
dc.subjectautomation
dc.subjectsmart environment
dc.titleThe Science of Home Automation
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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