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dc.contributor.advisorHaberman, Melvin
dc.creatorLawton, Jill E.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-25T20:36:42Z
dc.date.available2012-04-25T20:36:42Z
dc.date.issued4/25/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/3432
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractObesity prevention in the schools poses a complex challenge. Evidence would suggest that it requires a complex multi-pronged approach to make an impact. Nutritional education, changes in food quality and macronutrient content, and physical activity, as well as community and family support programs, are all important pieces of a complex picture. For programs to succeed, evidence shows some very fundamental changes in nutritional content of food served in schools, and in physical activity requirements, could go a long way in making a positive difference in fighting childhood obesity. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness among pediatric nurses and health care providers regarding the need for more rigorous nutrition standards for foods served in the National School Lunch Program; and to raise awareness of current standards for nutrition and physical activity in the public school system. Providing nurses with better tools to support community, family, and individuals in their quest for better health is important.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.titleObesity Prevention in Schools: Implications for Nursing
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)