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dc.creatorGovernment Information Working Group
dc.creatorBlake, Wendy
dc.creatorGalbraith, Betty
dc.creatorBeebe, Nancy
dc.creatorVon Seggern, Marilyn
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T15:37:49Z
dc.date.available2015-10-16T15:37:49Z
dc.date.issued5/15/2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5358
dc.descriptionThe "Government and Waste" Exhibit complements the WSU Common Reading book for 2014-15, ““Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash,” by Edward Humes. Government is deeply embedded in national efforts to manage waste and mitigate the negative effects of waste on our landscape, in our water, and in space. Many government agencies are active in waste management: the Environmental Protection Agency monitors solid household and industrial waste and hazardous waste, and regulates pollution hazards to our clean water, air, and land. It is involved in recycling efforts on many fronts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) monitors space debris. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is proposing solutions to the marine debris crisis. The Dept. of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health are concerned about the health effects of hazardous waste and polluted waterways, air, and habitable areas. The Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) is involved in debris cleanup efforts after storms and tsunamis. Virtually all state and city governments are involved in waste management as well. The Libraries’ Government Information Working Group presents photos and government resources that portray the stark realities of too much garbage and suggest a few of the many solutions that are being researched and tested.
dc.description.abstractWaste, debris, garbage, trash—all words for the unwanted material that is discarded (either intentionally or not) and has become a problem of immense proportions in the United States. Debris permeates not just the land we live on but other parts of the environment as well. Marine debris flowing from rivers as well as washed out to sea by hurricanes and tsunamis has accumulated in huge ‘gyres’ in the world’s oceans. Space debris (space junk) from satellites and space missions litters both low and high earth orbit, creating hazards for other satellites and space missions. Solid waste is a challenge and primary expense for every area, rural or urban, in the country. This exhibit, created by the Government Information Working Group of the WSU Libraries, presents a look at these 3 types of debris and a few solutions.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.titleGovernment and Waste
dc.typeEducational Resource


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  • Von Seggern, Marilyn
    This collection features scholarly work by Marilyn Von Seggern, librarian at Washington State University.

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