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dc.creatorMeakin, Eunice A., 1927-2004
dc.creatorPrice, M. Christine
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-13T20:44:16Z
dc.date.available2016-10-13T20:44:16Z
dc.date.issued2003-12
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)960688775
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/6418
dc.description.abstractWhether you are preparing food for guests or for the family, a pleasant atmosphere helps good food taste better. Courtesies extended to family members and guests put everyone at ease. You have responsibilities as a guest and as a host or hostess. When practiced daily, courtesies require no special thought or effort. Courtesy is kindly consideration of others. Etiquette is graciousness that comes from the heart. It is not stiff formality. Traditions reflect an earlier age. The dining traditions outlined here come from a time when the nuclear family with a male head of household and his wife served as host and hostess. If your family situation differs, adapt these guidelines to make them work for you.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPullman, Washington : Washington State University. Extension.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesExtension mimeo (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension) ; 3443
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subject.lcshTable service.
dc.subject.lcshTable setting and decoration.
dc.subject.lcshTable etiquette.
dc.subject.lcsh4-H clubs.
dc.titleDinner is served : an etiquette guide
dc.typeExtension Publication


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